ORCID

http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4753-5569

Date of Award

2020

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Education (Ph.D)

Department

Education Specialties

First Advisor

Seokhee Cho

Second Advisor

Edwin Tjoe

Third Advisor

James Campbell

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to observe the impact of technology on improving science achievement in Elementary students. In specific, this study examined the effects of virtual science laboratory activities on the science learning of 20 African American students in grades four. Using a quasi-experimental design, students in grades four, were randomly assigned to a treatment (virtual labs) or comparison (traditional hands-on labs) group. Ten students participated in treatment group and ten students participated in the comparison group. The students conducted science experiments for 50 minutes, one time a week, for 8 weeks. Both groups were given a pretest and posttest using the Terra Nova 3 Survey Assessment in Science grade 4 and students’ motivation toward science learning (SMTSL) questionnaire. Gains between the pretest and posttest scores were analyzed for each instrument using the Mann Whitney U test. The New York State Intermediate Level Science Assessment Test (ILSAT) for grade 4 was also administered to the treatment and comparison group and analyzed using the Mann Whitney U test. Students in the treatment group did not show any significant gains in scores, on the Terra Nova 3 Survey Assessment in Science for grade 4 and SMTSL, respectively, than students in the comparison group. Students in the treatment group for the ILSAT showed a significant higher score than students in the comparison group. In conclusion, the intervention had a significant impact on the ILSAT score gains. The limitations of the study and implications for future research were discussed.

Share

COinS