ORCID

http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8235-937X

Date of Award

2020

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Education (Ph.D)

Department

Education Specialties

First Advisor

Seokhee Cho

Second Advisor

Birringer-Haig

Third Advisor

James Campbell

Abstract

The purpose of this non-experimental research was to determine the influence of the amount of instructional days and amount of instructional time in minutes on high school students’ Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus exam scores. The study involved 755 students from sixteen high schools across the United States. A Three-Way Between-Subjects Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) revealed that there was a statistically significant difference in AP Calculus scores based on the amount of instructional days, the amount of instructional time in minutes, and the class type (AB or BC). There was not a statistically significant difference in AP Calculus scores based on the school type (public or private). A multiple linear regression revealed that the amount of instructional time in minutes, class type (AB or BC), and the percentage of students who took both an AP Calculus course and exam, were statistically significant contributors towards the linear model predicting a student’s AP Calculus score. The amount of instructional days and school type (public or private) were not significant contributors towards the same linear model. The results were important in that they justified the theoretical framework of constructivism. Relevant implications include the support for school districts to increase the amount of instructional time in minutes for the school year.

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